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Most Chipotle restaurants hacked with credit card stealing malware

The company first acknowledged the breach on April 25. But a blog post on Friday revealed the kind of malware used in the attack and the restaurants that were affected.

The list of attacked locations is extensive and includes many major U.S. cities. When CNNMoney asked the company Sunday about the scale of the attack, spokesman Chris Arnold said that “most, but not all restaurants may have been involved.”

Chipotle (CMG) said in its blog post that it worked with law enforcement officials and cybersecurity firms on an investigation.

The breaches happened between March 24 and April 18. The malware worked by infecting cash registers and capturing information stored on the magnetic strip on credit cards, called “track data.” Chipotle said track data sometimes includes the cardholder’s name, card number, expiration date and internal verification code.

The company said there is “no indication” that other personal information was stolen.

“During the investigation we removed the malware, and we continue to work with cyber security firms to evaluate ways to enhance our security measures,” the blog post reads.

A list of the restaurants and times they were affected can be found on Chipotle’s website.

The company recommended that customers scan their credit card statements for potentially fraudulent purchases. It also said victims should contact the Federal Trade Commission, the attorney general in their home states or their local police department.

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Portland mayor calls for cancellation of free-speech rally

The mayor of Portland, Oregon, on Monday urged U.S. officials and organizers to cancel a “Trump Free Speech Rally” and similar events, saying they are inappropriate could be dangerous after two men were stabbed to death on a train as they tried to help a pair of young women targeted by an anti-Muslim tirade.

Mayor Ted Wheeler said he hopes the victims will inspire “changes in the political dialogue in this country.”

Taliesin Myrddin Namkai Meche, 23, and Ricky John Best, 53, were killed as they tried to stop Jeremy Joseph Christian from harassing the women, one of whom was wearing a hijab, authorities say. Another who stepped in was seriously injured.

Christian’s social media postings indicate an affinity for Nazis and political violence. He was charged with aggravated murder, intimidation — the state equivalent of a hate crime — and being a felon in possession of a weapon and was scheduled to be in court Tuesday.

The federal government has issued a permit for the free-speech rally Saturday and has yet to give a permit for an event June 10. The mayor says his main concern was the participants “coming to peddle a message of hatred,” saying hate speech is not protected by the Constitution.

A Facebook page for the event says there would be speakers and live music in “one of the most liberal areas on the West Coast.” It features Kyle Chapman, who describes himself as an American nationalist and ardent supporter of President Donald Trump. Chapman was arrested at a March 4 protest in Berkeley, California.

Trump condemned the stabbing, writing Monday on Twitter: “The violent attacks in Portland on Friday are unacceptable. The victims were standing up to hate and intolerance. Our prayers are w/ them.”  Read More

Uber and Lyft return to Austin after Texas law kills the city’s fingerprint rule

Ride-hailing giants Uber and Lyft, which left Texas’ tech-savvy capital city a year ago over local fingerprint requirements for drivers, have returned after state lawmakers intervened.

Both companies began rolling on Austin’s streets again Monday, when Gov. Greg Abbott signed into law a bill that puts the state — not local governments — in charge of regulating the ride-hailing industry.

Local leaders in Austin, the conservative state’s most liberal city, argued unsuccessfully that its tech-driven economy was uniquely positioned to launch capable alternatives that could fill the gap.

“Austin is an incubator for technology and entrepreneurship, and we are excited to be back in the mix,” Uber spokesman Travis Considine said Thursday. “ We know that we have a lot of work to do in the city, but we couldn’t be more excited for the road ahead.”

Uber and Lyft — which are both based in San Francisco — fled Austin after losing a bruising and expensive fight to replace an Austin ordinance that required fingerprint-based background checks of drivers, a variety of data reporting and other requirements.

Advocates for fingerprinting say it’s the best way to weed out drivers with criminal records. Uber and Lyft have argued their background checks suffice and that fingerprint databases can be out of date. Fingerprinting can also slow down the process of adding new drivers.  Read More

Snapchat needs to evolve—or it’ll be brutally slaughtered by Facebook.

For Facebook, Snapchat isn’t an app to be feared.

It’s a feature to be absorbed.

The world’s largest social network  relentlessly taunts Snap Inc., their much-smaller competitor, known mostly for its disappearing messages app, by lifting Snap’s core functionality, and dumping it into a variety of products it doesn’t really belong.

Who knows what Facebook’s really thinking—the company tends to promote its features with fluff about letting you “share all the moments of your day“—but the ripoffs are almost certainly less about providing a service to users, and much more about outright killing Snapchat.

Some important background: An article in Bloomberg last year said Facebook was in a froth over a decline in “personal sharing” on its social network, which is used by 1.23 billion people every day. (Snapchat’s got 158 million daily users, its IPO filing revealed.) Personal sharing’s important: Your News Feed can’t just be a wasteland of viral videos and news about Hillary Clinton harvesting baby organs or whatever—you return to Facebook to see what your friends are up to.

When friends post personal statuses or pictures, it encourages you to do the same. Then Facebook has a nice crop of eager content-sharers to serve highly personalized ads to. Then, Facebook makes several billion dollars. Great!

The rub for Facebook, here, is that Snapchat’s all about intimate moments (and body parts) shared between friends (and lovers). You can take a snap of whatever, send it to whomever, and you don’t have to worry about your aunt or kid seeing it—as you do on Facebook. It’s a popular idea, and at the time of the Bloomberg report, Snapchat was enjoying explosive growth in its user base:

This lovely graph shows Snapchat's robust growth over a couple of years ending in December 2015.

 

Intel still beats Ryzen at games, but how much does it matter?

It’s OK now even if it’s not the fastest gaming processor ever—but the future gets tricky.

The response to AMD’s Ryzen processors with their new Zen core has been more than a little uneven. Eight cores and 16 threads for under $500 means that they’re unambiguously strong across a wide range of workloads; compute-bound tasks like compiling software and compressing video cry out for cores, and AMD’s pricing makes Ryzen very compelling indeed.  But gaming performance has caused more dissatisfaction. AMD promised a substantial improvement in instructions per cycle (IPC), and the general expectation was that Ryzen would be within striking distance of Intel’s Broadwell core. Although Broadwell is now several years old—it first hit the market way back in September 2014—the comparison was relevant. Intel’s high-core-count processors—both the High End Desktop parts, with six, eight, or 10 cores, and the various Xeon processors for multisocket servers—are all still using Broadwell cores.  Read More

Lockheed Martin to deliver world record-setting 60kw laser to U.S. Army

Lockheed Martin has completed the design, development and demonstration of a 60 kW-class beam combined fiber laser for the U.S. Army.  In testing earlier this month, the Lockheed Martin laser produced a single beam of 58 kW, representing a world record for a laser of this type. The Lockheed Martin team met all contractual deliverables for the and is preparing to ship it to the US Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command in Huntsville, Ala.

“Delivery of this laser represents an important milestone along the path to fielding a practical laser weapon system,” said Paula Hartley, vice president, Owego, New York general manager and Advanced Product Solutions within Lockheed Martin’s Cyber, Ships & Advanced Technologies line of business. “This milestone could not have been achieved without close partnership between the U.S. Army and Lockheed Martin; we are pleased to be able to deliver this system for their further integration and evaluation.”

Lockheed martin to deliver world record-setting 60kw laser to U.S. army

Lockheed Martin’s laser is a beam combined fiber laser, meaning it brings together individual lasers, generated through fiber optics, to generate a single, intense . This allows for a scalable laser system that can be made more powerful by adding more fiber laser subunits. The laser is based on a design developed under the Department of Defense’s Robust Electric Laser Initiative Program, and further developed through investments by Lockheed Martin and the U.S. Army into a 60kW-class system.

“The inherent scalability of this beam combined laser system has allowed us to build the first 60kW-class fiber laser for the U.S. Army,” said Robert Afzal, Ph.D., senior fellow for Laser and Sensor Systems. “We have shown that a powerful directed energy laser is now sufficiently light-weight, low volume and reliable enough to be deployed on tactical vehicles for defensive applications on land, at sea and in the air.”  Read More

 

GO GO GADGET When does the Samsung Galaxy S8 come out? Release date, price, rumours and specs

SAMSUNG is preparing to release the Galaxy S8 and leaks and rumours are already rife about what the new product will include.

Here’s everything you need to know about the new phone including release date, specs, rumours, features and price.

When will it come out?

Samsung fans were dealt a blow after the Galaxy Note 7 explosion debacle pushed the S8 release date back until April.

It has since been confirmed that the new model will be released on March 29, TechRadar reports.

It will be on pre-order from April 10 and is rumoured to land in stores on April 21.

The phone makers revealed that wrong sized batteries were to blame for the Note 7 which overheated and was recalled.

The South Korean firm may have postponed this launch in order to fully investigate those problems.

How much will it cost?

An exact figure has not yet been released but if previous prices and phones of similar models are a comparison then the Galaxy S8 will be in the region of £600.

It is rumoured the phone wil seel for $850 in the US – roughly £700 in the UK, according to TechRadar.

The Galaxy S7 can be bought for £619 while the S6 can be bought for £110.

The company have said they want to make the screen the main feature of the phone, with the aim for it to fill as much of the front face as possible.  Read More

For customer’s in South Korea who bought the ill-fated Note 7 they can get some money off the new phone, by trading their old model in.

Russian bank said it was hacked to frame connection with Trump Organization

(CNN) — The Russian bank that had an “odd” internet link to the Trump Organization during the presidential campaign is now claiming that U.S.-based hackers have recently launched cyberattacks to try to frame the bank.

Cybersecurity experts say this hack is a common type of prank. And it’s not directly related to activity discovered last year between the computer servers of Alfa Bank and the Trump Organization.

Alfa Bank believes the hack is meant to make it seem as if the Trump Organization is currently communicating with it.

In a statement, Alfa Bank said “the cyberattacks are an attempt by unknown parties to manufacture the illusion of contact” between Alfa Bank and the Trump Organization.

Last week, CNN revealed that the FBI’s counterintelligence team is still investigating whether there was a computer server connection between the Trump Organization and Alfa Bank during the U.S. election, according to sources close to the investigation.

The CNN report showed that the corporations offered only possible explanations — but no proof — as to why Alfa Bank was repeatedly looking up the contact information for a computer server used by the Trump Organization.

But on Friday, Alfa Bank claimed hackers are now trying to perpetuate that suspicion by tricking the Trump Organization into sending communication toward the bank.  Read More

 

Everything you need to know about the Google lawsuit that could derail Uber’s future

The first self-driving car prototypes are already navigating the roads in a few cities. But the real action is about to take place in the courtroom.

Google and Uber, the two giants at the forefront of developing the technology, are vying to own the emerging market and to suck up the profits.

The stakes are high and the fight is already getting personal, with Google accusing one of its star engineers of stealing some of its crown jewels.

google waymo

Last month, Waymo, the self-driving company owned by Google’s parent company Alphabet, sued Uber, claiming that one of its employees stole vital technology shortly before starting his own self-driving company (which Uber later acquired).

Autonomous cars have the potential to upend massive industries ranging from transportation to auto manufacturing. For Google and Uber, the opportunity and the threat posed by a world of self-driving vehicles is huge.

Google has been developing self-driving technology for the better part of a decade, and plans to license that technology to other car companies through Waymo. There’s also a chance Waymo will eventually develop its own ride-hailing service powered by self-driving cars to compete directly with Uber.  Read More

Brazil’s JBS and BRF Launch PR Campaign After Rotten Meat Raids

RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) – Meat companies JBS SA and BRF SA took out full-page advertisements in Brazilian newspapers on Saturday in efforts to burnish their image a day after police conducted a series of raids investigating bribes at meatpacking facilities.

Police said the raids, which threaten an industry with $12 billion in annual exports, were prompted by evidence that some meatpackers had paid inspectors and politicians to overlook the processing of rotten meat and exports with fraudulent documentation and even traces of salmonella.

Facing a crisis that even Brazil’s government said threatens its reputation as one of the world’s biggest exporters of meat products, JBS and BRF launched a public relations offensive to defend the integrity of their practices.

“Quality is the foremost priority of JBS and its brands,” read an advertisement by JBS, the world’s largest meat producer, in publications that included the major dailies of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, plus the weekly newsmagazine Veja.  Read More

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